Brooke in a ‘stable’ condition following Hexham fall

Henry Brooke: put into an induced coma before being airlifted to hospital

PICTURE: Martin Lynch (racingpost.com/photos) Brooke in a 'stable' condition following fall By lewis porteous 8:30aM 9 OCT 2016

HENRY BROOKE was reported to be in a stable condition on Sunday morning having been placed in an induced coma and airlifted to hospital with a suspected collapsed lung after a fall at Hexham on Saturday.

Brooke's mount Old Storm fell at the second fence in the 2m4f novice handicap chase, after which the rider was reportedly put into an induced coma before being transferred by air ambulance to Royal Victoria Infirmary in Newcastle around two hours after the race had taken place.

Brooke was in the front rank on the Brian Ellison-trained seven-year-old when he fell and was struck by a leg of one of the horses in behind.

Speaking on Sunday morning, the rider's agent Richard Hale told the Racing Post: "I heard last night they were leaving him in his coma. They'd obviously induced it but they were going to leave him there overnight but I haven't heard anything more this morning.

"I think he had fluid on his lung and they had been draining that off but that's the last I heard. They induced him just before they took him away from the track."

Stable condition

The Injured Jockeys Fund later released an official update, reporting the rider to be in a stable condition.

The statement read: "Following a fall at Hexham on Saturday, Henry Brooke was taken to the Royal Victoria Infirmary in Newcastle where he has been in a stable condition overnight.

"He is in an induced coma to assist him with his breathing and his condition this morning remains stable. His family would like to thank everyone for their support and well wishes."

Long delay

Racegoers ay Hexham were initially informed the air ambulance would be arriving, but were then told Brooke would be taken to hospital in a road ambulance instead.

However, medics decided against the road option and waited for the air ambulance. Clerk of the course James Armstrong explained: "The air ambulance is assigned on a priority basis, and a road ambulance was sent, but they said they were not going to move him on the road."

Racing resumed an hour and three-quarters behind schedule, with officials aiming to stage each race subsequent race as quickly as possible.

The concluding bumper, originally scheduled for 5.10, took place as the sun was setting at 6.15pm.

    Read More at Racing Post

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